Daoist Tapping Ceremony

Daoist Tapping Ceremony

The Sages of the Plum Red Robes were an order of Old Chinese Daoist monks from 2500 years ago. The Daoist Sages revered the winter solstice as their most sacred time of the year. The winter solstice marks the longest night of the year, where the sun is then reborn into the days of the new—bringing in a new energy. The Daoist Sages would gather for three days for a Plum Wine Fast and tap on a table with bone knockers. Our ways are linked to the ancient ways of the Sages of the Plum Red Robes.

In honor of their tradition, we gather each year during the winter solstice for a Plum Wine Fast and tap on a table for three days with bone knockers, just as the Daoist Sages of old once did. It’s a deep meditative process that takes one into a very deep trance state—a deep silence and calm. The wine doesn’t have a drunken effect on a person. It takes one into a state of softness and keen etheric perception.

Stuart Wilde reintroduced performing the Daoist Tapping Ceremony as a group in the land of the Ancient Etruscans. We gathered in the countryside of Tuscany in 2008 and 2009, bringing a tradition from 2500 years ago back into our day and age.

Previous Daoist Tapping Ceremonies:
2008 — Tuscany, Italy with Khris Krepcik and Stuart Wilde
2009 — Tuscany, Italy with Khris Krepcik and Stuart Wilde
2010 — Colorado, USA with Khris Krepcik
2011 — Ireland with Khris Krepcik and Stuart Wilde
2012 — Taos, New Mexico with Khris Krepcik and Ireland with Stuart Wilde
2013 — Ireland with Khris Krepcik

This year, Khris Krepcik will be hosting the Daoist Tapping Ceremony in: — Ireland.

The Plum Wine Fast
The Plum Wine Fast is drinking one shot glass (2.5 oz) of plum wine and one liter of water, every four hours, for three whole days (72 hours)—with no food. The fast begins at midnight on December 19th (12:00 am December 20th) and ends at midnight on December 22nd (12:00 am December 23rd). At the end of the fast, we celebrate with a midnight feast of fruits, vegetables, breads, and cheese.

The Tapping Ceremony
The tapping ceremony is performed with a circle of people sitting around a wooden table in silence. We simply tap in unison with bone chess pieces for 72 hours, with nothing but the sound of the tapping. We tap in shifts of groups of 6 to 12 people tapping at a time. The room goes very spacial and deep, with a speckled ambience to it, as if it were in another dimension, and you can often see people disappear.

Healing and Rejuvenation
We consider the Daoist Tapping Ceremony during the winter solstice to be our sacred, private time of the year to simply hang out together, heal, and rejuvenate ourselves from the work we do. As such, this event is not an event of scheduled lectures or healing sessions. It’s a gathering of those of like interest that have a deep reverence for this ancient ceremony. But we have been known to carry on metaphysical discussions. And Krepcik is always coming up with something new or sharing mystical aluna healing and ancient healing techniques of the Daoist Sages, Celts, and Etruscans. It’s always a very mystical experience.

This Workshop Includes:

  • Four Night’s Accommodation at the Venue
  • One Evening Dinner, before the Fast Begins
  • Plum Wine and Spring Water
  • Midnight Celebration Feast
  • Final Morning’s Breakfast

How to Register and Attend
This is a private event for current and previous members of Krepcik’s - Hooded Sage Course. Please click below for more information on this year’s tapping.

Daoist Tapping Ceremony with Khris Krepcik
December 19th - 23rd, 2014 — Ireland

Booked Full - Registration is Closed

Learn More about the Sages of the Plum Red Robes: Stuart Wilde - Plum Red - Taoist Tales of Old China

© 2010 - Khris Krepcik
The Hooded Sage. All Rights Reserved

About the Author

Khris Krepcik Khris Krepcik is a world renowned etheric healer and metaphysical teacher with an entire lifetime of training in ancient wisdoms and mystic arts. Krepcik is considered to be down to earth, natural, and real — authentic and genuine. Read the full Khris Krepcik Bio >